Formerly SuhaibWebb.com
Domestic Violence

Future Imams: We are Engaged in 1,000 year old Theological Wars and Our Communities Bleed

Let’s Get with Reality and Deal with the Real

A few years back, while in the states, I received a chilling phone call from a scared sister; voice shaking and tears falling she said, “Suhaib, my husband… my husband beat me! He beat me in front of our apartment in front of the non-Muslims!” I later found out that she went to the hospital with a fractured skull.

Brothers, I’m new to this internet game but what I’ve seen disgusts me. We are arguing, and I’m guilty of this as well, over issues that have no impact on our communities except leading by real bad examples. I encourage myself and all of our future Imams, leaders and Shuyukh to get with the real. Take a look at this video and realize that these things are happening in your communities and arguing the finner points of aqida, destroying each other and establishing your kingdom are not going to do much to help. Our communities are dying and we are fighting over very trivial issues. I ask for your forgiveness if I’ve done anything to any of you. Let’s move forward and benefit our societies.

Warning: Graphic Video Below

About the author

Suhaib Webb

Suhaib Webb is a contemporary American-Muslim educator, activist, and lecturer. His work bridges classical and contemporary Islamic thought, addressing issues of cultural, social and political relevance to Muslims in the West. After converting to Islam in 1992, Webb left his career in the music industry to pursue his passion in education. He earned a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of Central Oklahoma and received intensive private training in the Islamic Sciences under a renowned Muslim Scholar of Senegalese descent. Webb was hired as the Imam at the Islamic Society of Greater Oklahoma City, where he gave khutbas (sermons), taught religious classes, and provided counselling to families and young people; he also served as an Imam and resident scholar in communities across the U.S.

From 2004-2010, Suhaib Webb studied at the world’s preeminent Islamic institution of learning, Al-Azhar University, in the College of Shari`ah. During this time, after several years of studying the Arabic Language and the Islamic legal tradition, he also served as the head of the English Translation Department at Dar al-Ifta al-Misriyyah.

Outside of his studies at Al-Azhar, Suhaib Webb completed the memorization of the Quran in the city of Makkah, Saudi Arabia. He has been granted numerous traditional teaching licenses (ijazat), adhering to centuries-old Islamic scholarly practice of ensuring the highest standards of scholarship.

Webb was named one of the 500 Most Influential Muslims in the World by the Royal Islamic Strategic Studies Center in 2010 and his website, www.SuhaibWebb.com, was voted the best “Blog of the Year” by the 2009 Brass Crescent awards.

Suhaib Webb has lectured extensively around the world including in the Middle East, East Asia, Europe, North Africa and North America. Upon returning from his studies in Egypt, Webb lived in the Bay Area, California, where he worked with the Muslim American Society from Fall 2010 to Winter 2011. He currently serves as the Imam of the Islamic Society of Boston’s Cultural Center (ISBCC).

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  • Asalamu Alaykum

    SubhanAllah, its so sad to know that this goes on everyday… yet we are unknown to it.

    This can ruin a person’s mind, lifes and families.

    Cultural values and pressure put women in a very hard situation, and it all leads to a vicious cycle…
    I pray Allah gives these women to speak out against injustice against them..ameen

    Aysha

  • Owoothoobillahi min ash-shaytaan ar-rajeem. Starting to get a bit angry over that guy yelling at his wife in the video. Subhan Allah, these things happen in our communities so often, how can we overlook them?

    How do we raise awareness for issues like this within the community, when many of our masaajid won’t pay any attention to anyone who’s under the age of 30 or not making $250,000 a year?

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